Google

Monday, September 26, 2005

Legion Pages



The first and last pages of a 30-page story I did for "the Legion of Super-Heroes"...I didn't keep scans of the pencils, or else I'd post them...

8 Comments:

Blogger warren L said...

I remember seeing these at the 'Speakeasy' event you were at. Very confident work, as always. Just out of curiosity, what was the deadline on a 30 pager, fully inked? One month or so?

4:57 PM  
Blogger Paul Rivoche said...

No they allowed a lot longer Warren...sometimes they have a shorter deadline like that but, especially if you're both pencilling and inking, they usually schedule further ahead, as far as I know. In this case they was I think three or four months. I still got in a bit of trouble, barely making the deadline, since I was loaded up with other work too, not doing comics full time. I learned a lot though, not only about doing the pages, but more importantly I learned that I didn't want to draw mainstream comics! You have very little control, and it's a lot of work for little pay, compared to boarding or agency work etc...now I'm only interested in drawing my own comics, for bread and butter i'd much rather do ad art, as heretical as that probably sounds to die-hard comics types...to me drawing mainstream comics is just another type of commercial job now, except it ranks near the bottom of the hierarchy...

6:01 PM  
Blogger bustedacres said...

These look great. I'd love to see more, too. What issue was it and I'll seek it out. . .

Also, what are the odds of your posting some of those original MR X pages you did? I've been looking at those few reproduced in the trade paperback for more than ten years now, and I think they look great.

9:36 PM  
Blogger Paul Rivoche said...

It was issue 3 (out of a total of 6 issues) from a mini-series called "Legion Worlds" from DC comics of course, the issue was cover dated August 2001. Unfortunately I don't feel the color served the pages very well, he said trying to be charitable, so you may be disappointed with the final result...if you do manage to track it down.

I'll see what I can dig up on the Mister X stuff...

8:51 AM  
Blogger bustedacres said...

Sounds good. I'll find it! When I do, I'm curious to see the ways in which the color messes it up, too. . .that's always interesting, when two aspects of the art collide. Kind of like when you have a great song that is then torpedoed by a really over-the-top guitar solo or something.

I've been doing some Photoshop coloring practice on Jordi Bernet's TORPEDO pages, and it's interesting trying to color something that already works so well without color, trying to serve the story and stay out of the artist's way but still add something, too.

1:42 PM  
Blogger Dik Pose said...

Great looking pages, I love that shot with the ship... Your use of darks inspires me, throwing blacks across a page is not easy to do for many people...

1:54 PM  
Blogger warren L said...

Paul,

I've heard the same from a few other artists who've worked in comics. On the other hand, some of them wouldn't have it any other way...drawing their Heroes...

Still others can get their own stories out in one form or another. Thank goodness for anthologies...

Both 'Project:' stories you did were well-thought out, btw. Long live Pitzer.

4:27 PM  
Blogger Paul Rivoche said...

Thanks for the comments everyone!

Busted, I think you nailed it...too many colorists aren't willing to serve the story, they want to star...and in so doing, fall down. They don't read the story and the compositions and work to augment those; often they go against them, then there's a clash...good color is really demanding, to find the line between too much and too little.

Dik, about blacks, I try to study the greats, they manage to tiptoe the line between "too realistic but loses the design" and "too designy and loses the realism". That's why I love Noel Sickles, Toth who followed his lead, Caniff, Frank Robbins...those guys understood literal lighting, but alos how to modify it carefully to suit the page design, and doing it so skilfully your eye doesn't really notice...for example Toth, he's actually far more cartoony than it amy seem at first glance. His lighting looks "real" but when you break it down, he's taken all kinds of liberties...in a good way of course...

Warren, yep, Pitzer was great to work with, and there's a lot of promise in anthologies and the fact that mainstream book publishers in the US are jumping on the graphic novel bandwagon...

4:58 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home